Lexington

Once again The Bartender’s skills with a Manhatten sends in  New York worsts we’d be happy to have as best here. “The Lexington Hotel, The Catskills, New York, one of the oldest resort hotels in the US and a ghost trap for almost a hundred years.” Is this really what constitutes bad over there BSWAM? If so, you’re really making the Ledger thespian hole look even worse. Also some other Lexington shots.They all look fucking awesome to me, including the abandoned car! Dude, what are you doing?

About The Lazy Aussie

Commended Haiku writer. A lover of The West's Worst. Perth stand-up comedian, photographer and writer.
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81 Responses to Lexington

  1. Bento says:

    Woah – 3 storeys! What sort of crazy architecture is that? Positively not worst.

    Which reminds me, Barkeep – you mentioned Penn Station the other day. While I agree Madison Square Garden is a monstrosity, have a gander at our right-back-at-ya, right on our riverfront.

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    • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

      The only good thing I can say about Penn Station’s present form is that everybody hates it and the general plan is to tear it down and replace it with something shaped a little less like the engine filter off the top of a 1971 Plymouth.

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      • Ohh yes, I was going to say looks amazing from photos, but that was the old one long demolished.

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        • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

          The greatest architectural crime in New York City bar none.

          Nationwide, would probably go with the destruction of the Larkin Building in Buffalo by Frank Lloyd Wright.

          The loss of the Tiffany Mansion on Long Island to fire was another disaster, although at least the owners salavaged everything they could.

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          • Bento says:

            We would’ve at least kept the front bit of the old building.

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            • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

              I saw something odd on Googleviews – a classical portico in Perth that’s been retained in front of a glass box-like building. What is the story? The portico is beautifully proportioned but the contrast makes both elements look terrible.

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        • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

          I think the Javits is actually underrated. Given that the client pulled the carpet out from under the architect’s feet, the building is actually a fairly grand piece of High Tech-shifting-into-Po-Mo work.

          It is, however, is a shocking state of disrepair. And it is in what I consider to be the ugliest and most inhospitable neighborhood in Manhattan and one of the ugliest in the city.

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        • Bill O'Slatter says:

          Soviet style housing is a good description of St George’s Terrace.

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      • Bag O'Turnips says:

        That light blue car would be a 1961 Plymouth Valiant, which of course became the transplanted in RHD as the Chrysler Valiant R Series, which graced our shores in January 1962.

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  2. orbea says:

    AP5!!
    The whole town is abandoned? HP Lovecraft FTW

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    • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

      That was kind of where I was going with it.

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    • Natalia Fan #1 says:

      Bit too far south for Innsmouth, surely?

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        • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

          Lovecraft’s best IMO.

          “The Lurking Fear” is set in the Hudson River Valley. The Storm King Mountain actually exists and is a genuinely forbidding place, surrounded by a national park on one side and the military reserve of West Point Academy on the other. A more sinister place anywhere would be hard to imagine.

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          • Natalia Fan #1 says:

            The most merciful thing in the world I think is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents … or Rockingham. Where is JJ?

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          • Snuff says:

            On a vaguely related note, TBswaM, I’m considering taking the Lake Shore Limited from Chicago to NY in late April – early May. Yes, no, maybe ? Is its nickname the Late for sure Limited well deserved ? Any recommendations or warnings would be much appreciated.

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            • Snuff says:

              Scrub that, TBswaM. We had a meeting tonight and put the kybosh on that. We’ll fly.

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              • The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

                Damn! I’ve heard mixed things about that train. Either it’s Hell on Wheels or a Romantic Throwback to the Golden Age of Rail Travel. Or both, which is probably closest to the mark.

                Anyway, feel free to look me up when you’re in Gotham. I trust I can find a few suitable worsts to amuse you with.

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        • Natalia Fan #1 says:

          If only HPL had known about Rockingham. Wait: a new Winton/HPL pastiche suggests itself.

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  3. Natalia Fan #1 says:

    Well put TLA. I was worried for you after the recent Steve Priest incident, but copy on this and CHD has reassured me no end. Not worst, unless Manhatten can supply further context and suggest why not.

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  4. Snuff says:

    Not worst, especially the TorqueFlite. For mine, the best looking Valiant ever.

    Wait. Speed limit 30 ! I take it all back.

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    • Natalia Fan #1 says:

      30 MPH = 48.28032 KPH, close enough to our own speed limit in built up areas.

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      • It’s LESS than 50ks. Doesn’t matter how much less.

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        • orbea says:

          speed limit should be reduced to 30kmh, like many german urban areas
          In lexington the only thing to hit are zombies – so very similar to Perth really

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        • Natalia Fan #1 says:

          “Sorry Officer, I thought I was doing well under 48.28032 kph.”

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          • Snuff says:

            Don’t mind me. I’m just nostalgic for the days when the Territory had no limit on the highways between towns, although I do like the CLP’s hilarious concern about fatigue-related fatalities. More to the point, as a card carrying member of the Franz Reichelt Motorcycle Club, I’m just cranky that I have to watch my step until August when my demerit points square up.

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            • langhorne says:

              I remember voting no in the referendum to statehood because then we would have speed limits on the highways. Actually I voted no because if the native territorians were so stoopid as to make that a reason to vote no for statehood, they didn’t deserve statehood.

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          • Bag O'Turnips says:

            I’ve often thought of myself as the Chief Enforcer of The Subcommittee For The Metrification Of Song Lyrics Board…imagine the possibilities!

            “I will walk eight-hundred-and-foor-point-six-seven-two kilometres, and I will walk eight-hundred-and-foor-point-six-seven-two more,
            Just to be the man that walked one thoosand-six-hundred-and-nine-point-three-foor-foor kilometres to fall down at your door”

            “…All I need is five-hundred-and-sixty-eight-point-two-six-one-two-five millilitres a day, if we ever get out of here…”

            “Give two-point-five-four centimetres, take ninety-one-point-four-four, take it all”.

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        • Rolly says:

          Which is at least 30 km/hr faster than most Perth urban motor vehicle operators (you can’t justifiably refer to them as drivers) are reasonably capable of guiding their pretentious chariots.
          Sleep deprivation being recouped whilst in the driving seat of a car.
          Young cunts included.

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    • E.V. says:

      The Torqueflite (904 & 727 versions) were considered the strongest and smoothest transmissios their day, bettered only by the Mercedes Benz 4 sp auto. Pretty sure thats a ’60 Plymouth Valiant, also marketed as a Dodge lancer, same body with different trimmings. The U.S. Market also got coupe and convertible versions. One of the coolest looking cars of all time. Totally not worst.

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      • Snuff says:

        For sure, EV, and BO’T. Beautiful. Although I definitely prefer the front end on the Valiant to the Lancer.

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      • Bag O'Turnips says:

        They were pretty suave, especially for Detroit metal of that era.

        The effect that importing the design of the Plymouth Valiant for Chrysler Australia had a very significant impact on the local automotive industry: prior to this, Aussies were prepared to have outdated designs of motor cars, with barely adequately powered engines (the Ford Falcon, which was also a US “compact” car like the Valiant, helped bring modern streamlined design to our roads in 1960, which showed up the contemporaneous FB Holden as dated with its fins and doglegged windscreen, still was very modestly powered, only having a 2.3 L/144 c.i. six at first), but when the Valiant broke cover with its curvaceous R Series at the beginning of 1962, it proved a sensation, the allocated 1008 cars selling out within weeks, to be superseded by the similar less elaborate S Series, all of just over 10000 which too sold very well.

        The other attractive elements that were even more important than its winning looks were both its drivetrain with a powerful motor, the 225 c.i./3.7 L “slant” six coupled to a three-speed Torqueflite automatic gearbox, and its competitive price, being not much more than either the Holden or Falcon, but getting and arguably better car.

        These were a huge wake-up call to to not only GM-H and Ford Australia, which would both continue to be left in Chrysler Australia’s wake throughout the remainder of the 60s in regards to innovations (like V8 and Hemi 6 power, suspension and Torqueflite automatics), durability, quality and keen pricing, but also opened up the possibility of other car manufacturers from America, Britain, Europe and the newly-ascendant Japan of competing against the (then) dominance of The General, which in 1957 had over half of the local market to itself, with a single-model, four-bodystyle range and still commanded about 40% by 1969.

        The Australian automotive scene was forever altered by the arrival of both the Falcon and Valiant. Sure, the Val may have disappeared in 1981 and its successor, Mitsubishi, abandoned local manufacture in 2008 and its now Toyota that is the dominant brand in Australia, with daylight then Holden next. But I believe it was the Chrysler that had a greater impact, for it spurred on a virtuous circle of rapid improvement not only upon Holden and Ford, but also anyone else who wanted a slice of the Australian motoring pie, of which we’ve become one of the most competitive and testing markets for any marque anywhere.

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  5. The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

    It’s a bit like “Silent Hill” except with snow rather than ash, and fewer zombies.

    The Valley is studded with communities like these that were once fashionable resorts of the Civil War era and which have spent the last 150 years sinking into a quagmire of fading social cachet and non-existant economics. I was literally the only person out and about in the village the Sunday afternoon I took these.

    Ugly is as ugly does, but something once beautiful left to decay can be a worst too, I think.

    On the other hand, the locals will never tell you how vibrant anything is. So. I guess there’s an upside.

    Like

  6. The Bartender's skills with a Manhatten says:

    Or let me put it this way:

    Charming Victorian village, full of landmark architecture, free to whoever feels like climbing to the top of Mount Doom and moving in. Enjoy lovely views, peace and quiet like the grave, unspoiled forests full of pack wolves and serial killers and the odd lurching revenant! Cold water only, mostly through the roof.

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  7. 'Tropical' langhorne says:

    I think the snow makes it Worst.

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  8. The Legend 101 says:

    That looks like a good hotel, i want to go there and where is Lexington by the way?

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    • Bento says:

      Dude, I’m not confident you could even find your way to the airport, let alone Lexington. Perhaps just stick to exploring Dianella and Bunbury for now. Baby steps.

      Like

  9. HAVE ADDED MORE PICS.

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    • Bag O'Turnips says:

      Almost reminds me of the sight gag (very effectual when I was TL101’s age back in the late 80s) of some of the neon letter tubes being shorted out on the sign for “Hotel Coral Essex” in Revenge Of The Nerds II: Nerds In Paradise (about only funny for horny teenage boys), in what was an ultimately successful means of attracting means of luring clientele to its doors.

      Doubt there’s any LEXINGTON HOT_Is there, for I don’t think that’s where a certain pornostar’s studios are.

      Like

    • langhorne says:

      Actually, take away the snow and it could be Tasmania. Fingal, perhaps, or maybe an old Hydro town.

      Like

  10. The Legend 101 says:

    I think i can find me way to the airport i know perth, Anyone could find Lexington now i know where it is.

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  11. skink says:

    me old mate Patti Patti was in Inside Cover today

    she has broken cover to announce she will be shaving her head again for charity

    in recognition of her commitment I am prepared to donate $1000, but only if she has it done by a sheep shearer. I want to see her with her neck wedged between the knees of a big bloke in a blue singlet with the crack of his arse showing out the top of his pants

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  12. perthluckystar says:

    Not worse. Looks like a great place to explore.

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  13. David Cohen says:

    All this mindless chatter, and no-one has asked:

    What happens in the Tap Room???

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  14. Sholaa says:

    Reminds me of my home town. Of course, the thing that doesn’t remind me of Frankland is that the roads have been plowed. Councils, actually maintain roads in a minority area? Pfffft.

    Like

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